Lecture 24 - Don Quixote, Part II: Chapters LXXI-LXXIV (cont.)

author: Roberto González Echevarría, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: Sept. 28, 2012,   recorded: December 2009,   views: 2175
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
Categories

See Also:

Download Video - generic video source Download yalespan300f09_echevarria_lec24_01.mp4 (Video - generic video source 739.1 MB)

Download Video Download yalespan300f09_echevarria_lec24_01.flv (Video 324.6 MB)

Download Video Download yalespan300f09_echevarria_lec24_01.wmv (Video 293.5 MB)

Download subtitles Download subtitles: TT/XML, RT, SRT


Help icon Streaming Video Help

Related Open Educational Resources

Related content

Report a problem or upload files

If you have found a problem with this lecture or would like to send us extra material, articles, exercises, etc., please use our ticket system to describe your request and upload the data.
Enter your e-mail into the 'Cc' field, and we will keep you updated with your request's status.
Lecture popularity: You need to login to cast your vote.
  Bibliography

Description

Would have Cervantes deserved such recognition, had he not written the Quixote? The answer is no. However, he would probably be remembered for some of his other works. Two of The Exemplary Stories, significantly connected together, are commented in this lecture. "The Deceitful Marriage" deconstructs marriage both as a social institution and as a narrative tool: Cervantes manipulates literary conventions by beginning with what is normally the end of a story, a marriage, and works backwards to undue a union that never took place legitimately. In "The Dogs Colloquy" we skirt the supernatural idea that dogs can talk. The story is a picaresque autobiography in which the pícaro pretends to be a dog. Perhaps Scipio's life, not told here, could have been another Quixote. The author of a story, it is suggested, does not control the text while it is being read. A short comment on Kafka's parable "The Truth about Sancho Panza" and Borges' story Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote precede the end of this last lecture that refers to Cervantes' death. Drawing a parallel between Cervantes' death and that of Don Quixote and Alonso Quijano, González Echevarría reads the dedication to Persiles and Cervantes', and also his own, farewell to this course.

Link this page

Would you like to put a link to this lecture on your homepage?
Go ahead! Copy the HTML snippet !

Reviews and comments:

Comment1 James, September 16, 2015 at 10:20 p.m.:

I have now gone through all the lectures by Professor Echevarria. Thank you for making them available. I feel lucky to have experienced these lectures. It is a comprehensive, high quality and scholarly presentation that a non student finds difficult to find. I have learned a great deal.....Thank you again.

Write your own review or comment:

make sure you have javascript enabled or clear this field: