Lecture 9 - Middle Classes

author: John Merriman, Department of History, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: April 16, 2010,   recorded: October 2008,   views: 3140
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
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The nineteenth century in Europe is, in many ways, synonymous with the rise of the bourgeoisie. It is misleading, however, to consider this newly dominant middle class as a homogenous group; rather, the century may be more accurately described in terms of the rise of plural middle classes. While the classes comprising this group were united by their search for power based on property rights rather than hereditary privilege, they were otherwise strikingly diverse. Contemporary stereotypes of the bourgeois as a grasping philistine ought to therefore be nuanced. Along with the real, undeniable cruelty of many capitalists with respect to their workers, the middle classes also pioneered the first philanthropic voluntary associations, broadened the reach of public education, and inspired the development of effective birth control.

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Reviews and comments:

Comment1 zvone, October 6, 2010 at 5:43 p.m.:

belgrade was NOT most industrialized city of balkan in 19.ct. it was zagreb , as then part of austrohungary and it's industrial revolution. Belgrade was 500 years before, until middle of 19. ct. part of otoman empire where main industry was pork industry.
For example, before ww2 communist party of yugoslavia didn't had it's quarters in belgrade, only in zagreb, where there only was some number or class-conciouss workers.

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