Lecture 6 - Maximilien Robespierre and the French Revolution

author: John Merriman, Department of History, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: April 16, 2010,   recorded: September 2008,   views: 509
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
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Robespierre's ascetic personal life and severe philosophy of political engagement are attributed by some to his difficult childhood. As a revolutionary, one of his most significant insights was that the Revolution was threatened not only by France's military adversaries abroad, but also by domestic counter-revolutionaries. Under this latter heading were gathered two major groups, urban mercantilists and rural peasants. Relative strength of religious commitment is the major factor in explaining why some regions of France rose up in defense of the monarchy while others supported the Revolution.

Reading assignment:

Merriman, John. A History of Modern Europe: From the Renaissance to the Present, pp. 467-516

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Comment1 garston liang, May 24, 2010 at 4:28 a.m.:

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