Lecture 3 - Dutch and British Exceptionalism

author: John Merriman, Department of History, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: April 16, 2010,   recorded: September 2008,   views: 4028
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
Categories

See Also:

Download Video Download yalehist202f08_merriman_lec03_01.flv (Video 587.5┬áMB)


Help icon Streaming Video Help

Related Open Educational Resources

Related content

Report a problem or upload files

If you have found a problem with this lecture or would like to send us extra material, articles, exercises, etc., please use our ticket system to describe your request and upload the data.
Enter your e-mail into the 'Cc' field, and we will keep you updated with your request's status.
Lecture popularity: You need to login to cast your vote.
  Bibliography

Description

Several reasons can be found to explain why Great Britain and the Netherlands did not follow the other major European powers of the seventeenth century in adopting absolutist rule. Chief among these were the presence of a relatively large middle class, with a vested interest in preserving independence from centralized authority, and national traditions of resistance dating from the English Civil War and the Dutch war for independence from Spain, respectively. In both countries anti-absolutism formed part of a sense of national identity, and was linked to popular anti-Catholicism. The officially Protestant Dutch, in particular, had a culture of decentralized mercantile activity far removed from the militarism and excess associated with the courts of Louis XIV and Frederick the Great.

Reading assignment:

Merriman, John. A History of Modern Europe: From the Renaissance to the Present, pp. 243-260 and 311-334

Link this page

Would you like to put a link to this lecture on your homepage?
Go ahead! Copy the HTML snippet !

Write your own review or comment:

make sure you have javascript enabled or clear this field: