Lecture 23 - Valence Theory and Constitutional Structure (1858)

author: J. Michael McBride, Department of Chemistry, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: June 10, 2010,   recorded: October 2008,   views: 2546
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
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Description

Youthful chemists Couper and Kekulé replaced radical and type theories with a new approach involving atomic valence and molecular structure, and based on the tetravalence and self-linking of carbon. Valence structures offered the first explanation for isomerism, and led to the invention of nomenclature, notation, and molecular models closely related to those in use today.

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Reading assignments, problem sets, PowerPoint presentations, and other resources for this lecture can be accessed from Professor McBride's on-campus course website, which was developed for his Fall 2008 students. Please see Resources section below.

Resources:

Professor McBride's web resources for CHEM 125 (Fall 2008)

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