Lecture 1 - How Do You Know? Freshman Organic Chemistry

author: J. Michael McBride, Department of Chemistry, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: June 9, 2010,   recorded: September 2008,   views: 1893
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
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Description

Professor McBride outlines the course with its goals and requirements, including the required laboratory course. To the course's prime question "How do you know" he proposes two unacceptable answers (divine and human authority), and two acceptable answers (experiment and logic). He illustrates the fruitfulness of experiment and logic using the rise of science in the seventeenth century. London's Royal Society and the "crucial" experiment on light by Isaac Newton provide examples. In his correspondence with Newton Samuel Pepys, diarist and naval purchasing officer, illustrates the attitudes and habits which are most vital for budding scientists - especially those who would like to succeed in this course. The lecture closes by introducing the underlying goal for the first half of the semester: understanding the Force Law that describes chemical bonds.

Problem sets/Reading assignment:

Reading assignments, problem sets, PowerPoint presentations, and other resources for this lecture can be accessed from Professor McBride's on-campus course website, which was developed for his Fall 2008 students. Please see Resources section below.

Resources:

Professor McBride's web resources for CHEM 125 (Fall 2008)

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Comment1 Ozgur, May 29, 2011 at 10:56 p.m.:

The best web site addresses for chemistry.
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http://www.scientificpages.net/chemis...

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