Robert Bennett
homepage:http://www.law.northwestern.edu/faculty/profiles/RobertBennett/
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Description

A scholar in the field of constitutional law, Robert Bennett has been a member of the faculty of the Northwestern University School of Law since 1969, serving as the school’s dean from 1985 to 1995. Since 2002 he has been the Nathaniel L. Nathanson Professor of Law at Northwestern. With some regularity Professor Bennett teaches a seminar in the Law of American Democracy and courses in contracts, legislation, constitutional law, and constitutional theory. Professor Bennett has also taught as a visiting professor at the University of Illinois College of Law, the University of Virginia School of Law, the University of Southern California Law Center, Brooklyn Law School, and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law of Yeshiva University.

Professor Bennett is a fellow of the American Bar Foundation, and served as the Foundation’s president from 1992 to 1994. He has been a member of the American Law Institute since 1979. He was also a co-founder of the Chicago Council of Lawyers and served as its president.

Professor Bennett is the author of numerous books and articles. His two most recent books are Talking It Through: Puzzles of American Democracy, published by Cornell University Press in 2002 and Taming The Electoral College, published by Stanford University Press in 2006. At the present time he is at work on a (co-authored) book about constitutional interpretation for Cornell University Press, tentatively titled Originalism and Living Constitutionalism.

Professor Bennett received his BA, summa cum laude, in 1962 from Harvard University and his LLB, cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 1965. At Harvard College he was elected to phi beta kappa and at Harvard Law School he was a member of the editorial board of the Harvard Law Review.

Professor Bennett received a Knox Memorial Fellowship from Harvard University for study at the London School of Economics in 1965-66, and the following year he served as legal assistant to Commissioner Nicholas Johnson of the Federal Communications Commission. He was Reginald Heber Smith Fellow at the Office of Economic Opportunity, assigned to the Chicago Legal Aid Bureau in 1967-68, and he practiced law as an associate at the Chicago law firm of Mayer, Brown & Platt in 1968-69.


Lectures:

debate
flag The Electoral College Experts Audience Dialogue (Part 5)
as author at  To Keep or Not to Keep the Electoral College: MIT World Series: New Approaches to Electoral Reform,
together with: Arnold I. Barnett (moderator), Judith Best, Robert Hardaway, Paul Schumaker, Akhil Amar, John Fortier, Alan Natapoff, Alexander S. Belenky, Vikram Amar, Alexander Keyssar,
2948 views
  debate
flag The Electoral College Experts Debate and Audience Dialogue (Part 4)
as author at  To Keep or Not to Keep the Electoral College: MIT World Series: New Approaches to Electoral Reform,
together with: Alexander S. Belenky (moderator), Judith Best, Alexander Keyssar, Robert Hardaway, John Fortier, Akhil Amar, Vikram Amar, Paul Schumaker, Arnold I. Barnett, Alan Natapoff, David Hawking,
3247 views
debate
flag What (if Anything) Should Be Done About Improving the System of Electing a President? (Part 2)
as author at  To Keep or Not to Keep the Electoral College: MIT World Series: New Approaches to Electoral Reform,
together with: Akhil Amar, Vikram Amar, Alexander Keyssar, Paul Schumaker,
2800 views