Learning to Distinguish Valid Textual Entailments

author: Marie-Catherine de Marneffe, Stanford University
published: Feb. 25, 2007,   recorded: April 2006,   views: 374


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This paper proposes a new architecture for textual inference in which finding a good alignment is separated from evaluating entailment. Current approaches to semantic inference in question answering and textual entailment have approximated the entailment problem as that of computing the best alignment of the hypothesis to the text, using a locally decomposable matching score. While this formulation is adequate for representing local (word-level) phenomena such as synonymy, it is incapable of representing global interactions, such as that between verb negation and the addition/removal of qualifiers, which are often critical for determining entailment.

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