Lecture 3: Rutherford Model of the Atom, Bohr Model of Hydrogen

author: Donald R. Sadoway, Center for Future Civic Media
recorded by: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT
published: Feb. 10, 2009,   recorded: September 2004,   views: 2725
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)

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"It's time to get back to learning. A couple of announcements before we get started: tomorrow there will be a 10 minute quiz in recitation based upon the content of homework one. Obviously, it's not going to be a question identical to something you've done, but it's going to cover that subject matter.

So, please don't bring in your attorney if I didn't ask a question that's identical to one that you've worked. Second thing, we started talking about the periodic table, and I believe that it's a hallmark of any educated person in the 21st century who is technically literate to know the periodic table by heart."It's time to get back to learning. A couple of announcements before we get started: tomorrow there will be a 10 minute quiz in recitation based upon the content of homework one. Obviously, it's not going to be a question identical to something you've done, but it's going to cover that subject matter.."

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Reviews and comments:

Comment1 Joseph George, November 26, 2009 at 2:03 a.m.:

An electron can exhibit wave nature when it is situated in the following circumstances. a) In a background from radio waves to gamma rays. b) In a varying electric or magnetic field. c) When an electron is accelerated [for example, when an electron is accelerated by electric field or magnetic field (attraction or repulsion) and accelerated by a radioactive nucleus (beta ray)].
We know that, in an isolated- non-radioactive atom, there are two types of forces acting on its electrons. They are, attraction from the nucleus and repulsion between electrons (in hydrogen atom, attraction from the nucleus only). But, these forces cannot create constant motion in electrons and so there is no any wave nature for electrons. Since there is no motion, there must be an additional force acting, which prevents the electrons from falling into the nucleus.
Volume of atoms and elastic nature of atoms [for example, 1. gas atoms move randomly in high speed and bounce back when they collide with other atoms or its container, 2. the capacity of a material to store thermal energy (oscillation and collision between atoms)] indicate that the nucleus of an atom is surrounded by a form of elastic matter. I name this matter as ‘space matter’. So the ‘additional force’ mentioned is the buoyant force exhibited by space matter that prevents the innermost electrons of an atom from falling into the nucleus. For the electrons other than one nearest to the nucleus, repulsion with the electrons in the inner region as well as the buoyant force exerted by space matter, keep the electrons in an atom in its respective positions.

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