Grief-Stricken in a Crowd: The Language of Bereavement and Distress in Social Media

author: Jed R. Brubaker, University of California, Irvine
author: Funda Kivran-Swaine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
published: July 6, 2012,   recorded: June 2012,   views: 2985
Categories

Slides

Related Open Educational Resources

Related content

Report a problem or upload files

If you have found a problem with this lecture or would like to send us extra material, articles, exercises, etc., please use our ticket system to describe your request and upload the data.
Enter your e-mail into the 'Cc' field, and we will keep you updated with your request's status.
Lecture popularity: You need to login to cast your vote.
  Bibliography

Description

People turn to social media to express their emotions surrounding major life events. Death of a loved one is one scenario in which people share their feelings in the semi-public space of social networking sites. In this paper, we present the results of a two-part investigation of grief and distress in the context of messages posted to the profiles of deceased MySpace users. We present coding system for identifying emotion distressed content, followed by a detailed analysis of language use that lays a foundation for natural language processing (NLP) tasks, such as automatic detection of bereavement-related distress. Our findings suggest that in addition to words bearing positive or negative sentiment, linguistic style can be an indicator of messages that demonstrate distress in the space of post-mortem social media content. These results contribute to research in computational linguistics by identifying linguistic features that can be used for automatic classification as well as to research on death and bereavement by enumerating attributes of distressed self-expression in a post-mortem context.

See Also:

Download slides icon Download slides: icwsm2012_brubaker_kivran_swain_media_01.pdf (3.4┬áMB)


Help icon Streaming Video Help

Link this page

Would you like to put a link to this lecture on your homepage?
Go ahead! Copy the HTML snippet !

Write your own review or comment:

make sure you have javascript enabled or clear this field: