Edward T. Linenthal
homepage:http://www.indiana.edu/~histweb/faculty/Display.php?Faculty_ID=19
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Description

My graduate student years at UC Santa Barbara started me on an interesting professional path, one that I never envisioned while working on a dissertation examining the warrior as a religious figure in America. I went directly from Santa Barbara to the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, where I spent 25 years in the department of religious studies. I never cared much, however, for disciplinary boundaries, nor for the academic jargon that each discipline seems to prize too much. I was interested in investigating and writing for a larger public about the less examined, that which did not, at first glance, seem “religious.” So, for example, in 1987-88 I was a Sloan Research Fellow in the Arms Control and Defense Policy Program at MIT, where I did the research for my book SYMBOLIC DEFENSE: THE CULTURAL SIGIFICANCE OF THE STRATEGIC DEFENSE INITIATIVE, which examined how supporters and opponents of the so-called “Star Wars” missile defense system mobilized powerful American myths and symbols to make their case. At this same time, I also joined Ira Chernus in co-editing A SHUDDERING DAWN: RELIGIOUS STUDIES IN THE NUCLEAR AGE. Throughout the 1980s, I was also at work on a larger project, which eventually became my next book, SACRED GROUND: AMERICANS AND THEIR BATTLEFIELDS, which examined processes of veneration, defilement, and redefinition at five sites: Lexington and Concord, the Alamo, Gettysburg, the Little Bighorn and Pearl Harbor. This project also began, happily, an ongoing relationship with the National Park Service. I worked for NPS at the 50th anniversary ceremonies at Pearl Harbor, and delivered the commemorative address at the memorial in 1994. I have also been a long-time consultant to NPS on interpretation of controversial historic sites, and from 2003-2005, I was a half-time Visiting Scholar in NPS’s Civic Engagement and Public History program.


Lecture:

lecture
flag The Predicament of Aftermath: Reflections on 9-11 and Oklahoma City
as author at  MIT World Series: The Resilient City: Trauma, Recovery and Remembrance,
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