Inference Complexity as Learning Bias

author: Pedro Domingos, Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington
published: Jan. 15, 2009,   recorded: November 2008,   views: 182

Slides

Related content

Report a problem or upload files

If you have found a problem with this lecture or would like to send us extra material, articles, exercises, etc., please use our ticket system to describe your request and upload the data.
Enter your e-mail into the 'Cc' field, and we will keep you updated with your request's status.
Lecture popularity: You need to login to cast your vote.
  Delicious Bibliography

Description

Graphical models are usually learned without regard to the cost of doing inference with them. As a result, even if a good model is learned, it may perform poorly at prediction, because it requires approximate inference. We propose an alternative: learning models with a score function that directly penalizes the cost of inference. Specifically, we learn arithmetic circuits with a penalty on the number of edges in the circuit (in which the cost of inference is linear). Our algorithm is equivalent to learning a Bayesian network with context-specific independence by greedily splitting conditional distributions, at each step scoring the candidates by compiling the resulting network into an arithmetic circuit, and using its size as the penalty. We show how this can be done efficiently, without compiling a circuit from scratch for each candidate. Experiments on several real-world domains show that our algorithm is able to learn tractable models with very large treewidth, and yields more accurate predictions than a standard context-specific Bayesian network learner, in far less time. (Joint work with Daniel Lowd.)

Link this page

Would you like to put a link to this lecture on your homepage?
Go ahead! Copy the HTML snippet !

Write your own review or comment:

make sure you have javascript enabled or clear this field: