Feedback-Regulated Mental Imagery in BCI Applications: Using Non-Invasive EEG and NIRS Signals

author: Christa Neuper, Department of Psychology, University of Graz
published: Aug. 10, 2009,   recorded: July 2009,   views: 1370
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Description

An important issue of brain-computer interface (BCI) development is to detect changes in brain signals that are related to specific intentions or thought processes. For example, mental motor imagery modulates the sensorimotor brain activity, and the detected changes can be used to operate a computer-controlled device. Clinical applications of this technology include the restoration of movement, such as control of grasping with the help of a neuroprosthesis, in severely paralyzed individuals. The motor imagery based BCI training may further be useful as a complementary therapeutic tool to facilitate functional recovery after stroke. To date, the majority of BCI systems rely on EEG recordings. However, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has recently attracted attention of BCI researchers due to its noninvasiveness, portability, short preparation time, and relatively low cost. In this talk I will shortly introduce the NIRS technique for BCI development and present data on how characteristic hemodynamic responses during motor imagery can be modulated by real-time NIRS feedback. Based on recent results I will finally discuss how simultaneous NIRS and EEG recordings might combine advantages of both approaches.

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Reviews and comments:

Comment1 Rez, February 11, 2010 at 6:40 a.m.:

Good lecture. Everyting is easily understandable. I think it only misses by neglecting some useful details. Such as the following:

-I was not always clear on what exactly was the imagined or performed motor task (ie: move a whole arm, only the hand, only a finger) and were the subjects instructed to imagine or perform such an act in a specific manner or direction.

-What is a "luria finger opposition task"?

-Are the subject's from the EEG+NIRS test all right handed? I was wondering why the "left hand movement" measures did not lateralize like the "right hand movement" did.

By the way, at 17:10, what flew by her?


Comment2 Rez, February 16, 2010 at 7:33 p.m.:

17:16


Comment3 sensor kit, April 5, 2011 at 7:33 a.m.:

Great information. An important issue of brain-computer interface (BCI) development is to detect changes in brain signals that are related to specific intentions or thought processes. For example, mental motor imagery modulates the sensor motor brain activity, and the detected changes can be used to operate a computer-controlled device. . The written style is very prompt and the highly practical manners. So fruitful for us. I have been reading the articles on this site for sometime. This is my first comment. Your blog has been very useful for me and it provides very good content and too informative,Thanks.

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