Lecture 6 - Guest Lecture by Andrew Goldstone

introducer: Amy Hungerford, Department of English, Yale University
author: Andrew Goldstone, Stanford University
recorded by: Yale University
published: April 8, 2011,   recorded: January 2008,   views: 4219
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
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Description

In this guest lecture, Teaching Fellow Andrew Goldstone provides us with some key concepts for understanding Modernism and Nabokov's relation in particular to his literary forebears T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, and Marcel Proust. Positing the "knight's move" as a description of Nabokov's characteristically indirect, evasive style, Goldstone argues that Nabokov's parodies of Modernist form in fact reveal his deep commitment to some of the same aesthetic principles. While the knight's move often indicates a playful attitude towards tradition, it also betrays a traumatic rupture with the past, reflecting a sense of exile that links Nabokov's art with the violence of Lolita's protagonist, Humbert.

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