Lecture 8 - Industrial Revolutions

author: John Merriman, Department of History, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: April 16, 2010,   recorded: September 2008,   views: 626
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
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Description

The Industrial Revolution was for a long time treated as a decisive break in which some countries, specifically England, innovated and progressed rapidly while others were left behind. This type of analysis leads many historians to overlook the more gradual process of industrialization in countries like France, and the persistence of older methods of artisanal production alongside new forms of mechanization. To understand the Industrial Revolution it is also necessary to take into account the Agricultural Revolution; the consequences of these twin developments include urban expansion and the "proletarianization" of rural laborers. Among the consequences of industrialization for workers are the imposition of industrial discipline and the emergence of schemes such as Taylorism dedicated to more efficiently exploiting industrial labor.

Reading assignment:

Merriman, John. A History of Modern Europe: From the Renaissance to the Present, pp. 553-597

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Reviews and comments:

Comment1 Dan, January 8, 2012 at 1:13 a.m.:

Damn shame. Is this lecture called the evils of the Industrial Revolution? The title must of confused me. I was expecting a lecture about how industry spread to the world.

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