Lecture 1 - Introduction: Milton, Power, and the Power of Milton

author: John Rogers, Department of English, Yale University
recorded by: Yale University
published: May 25, 2011,   recorded: September 2007,   views: 5156
released under terms of: Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives (CC-BY-ND)
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Description

An introduction to John Milton: man, poet, and legend. Milton's place at the center of the English literary canon is asserted, articulated, and examined through a discussion of Milton's long, complicated association with literary power. The conception of Miltonic power and its calculated use in political literature is analyzed in the feminist writings of Lady Mary Chudleigh, Mary Astell, and Virginia Woolf. Later the god-like qualities often ascribed to Miltonic authority are considered alongside Satan's excursus on the constructed nature of divine might in Paradise Lost, and the notorious character's method of analysis is shown to be a useful mode of encountering the author himself.

Resources Handout: Introduction to Milton [PDF]

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