Tom Moser
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Description

Tom Moser has successfully managed and led aerospace business expansion in the private sector, championed the development of commercial space systems, and managed large complex programs involving advanced state-of-the art technology with diverse domestic and international participants for the government. He has successfully met or exceeded all goals and objectives for each position for which he held. As Vice President of Government Programs for Constellation Services International, Inc. (CSI) in Woodland Hills, CA, Tom Moser served as the senior manager responsible for providing NASA with the definition of commercial systems for providing cargo services to the International Space Station (ISS). As Executive Director of the Texas Aerospace Commission in Austin, TX from 1998 – 2000, Mr. Moser served as the head of the state agency for developing the aerospace industry in Texas. He identified the opportunity and led the successful program for establishing commercial Spaceport(s) in Texas. Mr. Moser worked directly for Governor George W. Bush and closely with the leadership of the State Legislature. As Vice President of Aerospace Systems for Analytic Services Corporation (ANSER) in Arlington, VA, Mr. Moser directed advanced satellite systems development and operations, as well as the test and evaluation of advanced remote sensors and interceptors for missile defense. As Vice President of Business Development for Fairchild Space and Defense Corporation in Germantown, MD from 1989 – 1994, Mr. Moser managed all aspects of business development and strategic planning for spacecraft, subsystems and technical services. The business has $100 Million annual sales and 650 employees. At NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. as Deputy Associate Administrator/Program Director for NASA Office of Space Station from 1987 – 1989, and as Deputy Associate Administrator for NASA Office of Space Flight from 1986 – 1987, Mr. Moser managed all aspects of the international Space Station program including the $22 Billion development phase involving four NASA Centers, seven prime contractors, and 13 foreign countries. He was General Manager for the Office of Space Flight during the period of recovery from the Shuttle Challenger accident to the return to space flight. Mr. Moser secured approval and funding for development of the Space Station from NASA, three foreign space agencies, National Academy of Sciences, OMB, the White House, and Congress. He also negotiated international agreements with the space agencies of Europe, Canada and Japan for the development and operation of $7 Billion worth of space systems. Mr. Moser established the program plan for returning the Shuttle to safe flight status, and managed day-to-day operations involving the NASA Headquarters Office, 4 field centers, a $3 Billion annual budget, and 10,000 employees. At the NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, as Director of Engineering from 1983 – 1986, Deputy Program Manager Space Shuttle Orbiter from 1982 – 1983, Chief, Structural Design (from 1972 – 1982), and Manager, Structure and Thermal Protection Technical Manager for the Apollo Command Module from 1963 – 1972, Mr. Moser managed all aspects of the organization responsible for the development and engineering operations of manned Spaceflight programs and lead the development of advanced state-of-the-art structural and thermal protection systems for the Apollo and Shuttle Programs. Mr. Moser led the engineering effort for 18 successful Shuttle flights and the structural and mechanical engineering effort for 17 successful Apollo flights. He also led the structural development and unique qualification for the world's largest and most complex reusable manned spacecraft (Shuttle). Mr. Moser led the recovery effort for developing the structural integrity of the Shuttle/Thermal Protection System (Tiles), and headed the initial failure investigation of the Challenger accident.


Lecture:

lecture
flag Lecture 5: Orbiter Structure + Thermal Protection System
as author at  MIT 16.885J / ESD.35J Aircraft Systems Engineering - Fall 2005,
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